Anymore vs. Any More: When and How to Use Each

“Anymore vs. Any More” might seem like a tiny spelling difference, but it can change the meaning of a sentence completely! In this article, we’ll discover why these two phrases aren’t interchangeable. As we unravel the mystery, you’ll see how a space can make a world of difference in English. Get ready to clear up the confusion and use these terms correctly every time!

The Main Difference Between Anymore and Any More

Anymore vs. Any More: Understanding the Difference Pin

Anymore vs. Any More: Key Takeaways

  • Anymore” is an adverb that means “any longer” or “in the present day.”
  • Any more” is a determiner that means “an additional amount” or “something more.”
  • Anymore” is typically used in negative sentences, while “any more” is used in affirmative sentences.

Anymore vs. Any More: The Definition

What Does Anymore Mean?

Anymore” is an adverb that is used to indicate that something is no longer true or valid. It can also be used to describe a change in behavior or attitude.

For example:

  • “I don’t eat meat anymore.”
  • “She doesn’t work here anymore.”
  • “He doesn’t like coffee anymore.”

What Does Any More Mean?

Any more” is a determiner that is used to describe an additional amount of something. It can also be used to indicate that something has reached a limit.

For example:

  • “Do you have any more cookies?”
  • “I can’t take any more of this noise.”
  • “We don’t need any more volunteers.”

Anymore vs. Any More: Usage and Placement in a Sentence

Anymore can be placed at the end of a sentence to function as an adverb. For example:

  • We don’t have those kinds of parties anymore.
  • They don’t sell that product anymore.

Any more can be placed before a noun to act as a determiner. For example:

  • I don’t have any more time.
  • We don’t need any more help, thank you.

Tips to Remember the Differences

Here are some tips to help you remember the differences between “anymore” and “any more”:

  • Anymore” is typically used in negative sentences, while “any more” is used in affirmative sentences.
  • Anymore” is an adverb, while “any more” is a determiner.
  • Anymore” is used to indicate that something is no longer true or valid, while “any more” is used to describe an additional amount of something.

Anymore vs. Any More: Examples

Example Sentences Using Anymore

Here are some examples of how to use “anymore” in a sentence:

  • You don’t call me anymore.
  • I can’t eat spicy food anymore.
  • I don’t work there anymore.
  • We don’t have any milk anymore.
  • He doesn’t play video games anymore.
  • I don’t trust him anymore after what he did.
  • They don’t live in that neighborhood anymore.
  • Do you read the newspaper anymore?
  • We don’t have family gatherings anymore.
  • She doesn’t enjoy watching horror movies anymore.

As you can see, “anymore” is used to indicate that something is no longer the way it used to be. It means “any longer” or “to any further extent.”

Example Sentences Using Any More

Here are some examples of how to use “any more” in a sentence:

  • I don’t want any more coffee.
  • We don’t have any more time.
  • Is there any more cake left?
  • Do you have any more questions about the project?
  • I can’t handle any more stress right now. 
  • I can’t take any more criticism today.
  • Is there any more information available about the event?
  • We don’t have any more opportunities to try.
  • Is there any more milk in the fridge?
  • She doesn’t have any more patience for this.

As you can see, “any more” is used to refer to an additional amount of something. It means “some more” or “additional.”

Related Confused Words with Anymore or Any More

Anymore and any more are often confused with other words that sound similar but have different meanings. Here are a few examples:

Anytime vs. Any Time

Anytime is an adverb that means “at any time” or “whenever”. Any time refers to a specific time or length of time, and is often used with prepositions such as “in” or “at”. For example, “I can meet you anytime” vs. “I can meet you at any time“.

Learn more: Anytime vs. Any Time

Everyday vs. Every Day

Everyday is an adjective that means “commonplace” or “ordinary”. Every day refers to each day. For example, “I wear my everyday shoes every day“.

Explore more: Everyday vs. every day

Alot vs. A Lot

Alot is not a word. A lot means “a large amount” or “frequently”. For example, “I have a lot of work to do” or “I go to the gym a lot“.

Discover more: Alot vs. A lot

Further vs. Farther

Further refers to a greater extent or degree. Farther refers to a greater distance. For example, “I need to study further to pass the exam” vs. “The store is farther away than I thought”.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the difference between ‘anymore’ and ‘any more’?

‘Anymore’ is used to mean ‘any longer’ or ‘nowadays’, while ‘any more’ is used to describe the quantity of something, it’s an adverb. For example, “I don’t go to the gym anymore” means that the speaker used to go to the gym but no longer does,

Any more“is a determiner that means “an additional amount” or “something more”. For example, “I don’t have any more money” means that the speaker has run out of money.

Can ‘anymore’ and ‘any more’ be used interchangeably in a sentence?

No, ‘anymore’ and ‘any more’ cannot be used interchangeably in a sentence. They have different meanings and are used in different contexts.

What are some synonyms for ‘any more’?

Some synonyms for ‘any more’ include ‘further’, ‘additional’, ‘extra’, and ‘another’.

In what context should ‘anymore’ be used instead of ‘any more’?

‘Anymore’ should be used when referring to a change in a situation or state of being. For example, “I don’t watch TV anymore” means that the speaker used to watch TV but no longer does.

What are some examples of correct usage of ‘anymore’ and ‘any more’ in a sentence?

Correct usage of ‘anymore’: “I don’t eat meat anymore“, “I don’t smoke cigarettes anymore

Correct usage of ‘any more’: “I don’t have any more candy”, “I don’t want to hear any more excuses”

Last Updated on December 25, 2023

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