Weather Idioms

Weather idioms and sayings are a fun way to express ourselves and communicate about the weather. They are phrases that are commonly used to describe the weather or a situation related to the weather. For example, when it’s raining outside, we might say “it’s raining cats and dogs.” This phrase means that it’s raining heavily.

Subpages of Weather Idioms

List of Weather Idioms and Sayings

  • (A Breath of) Fresh Air
  • (Every Cloud Has a) Silver Lining
  • A Cold Day In July
  • A snowball’s chance in hell
  • A storm in a teacup
  • All Wet
  • Be snowed under
  • Be/feel under the weather
  • Blood and Thunder
  • Blow Hot and Cold
  • Bolt from the Blue
  • Brainstorm
  • Break the ice
  • Catch some rays
  • Chase Rainbows
  • Cold Day in Hell
  • Come Hell or High Water
  • Come rain or shine
  • Cook Up a Storm
  • Dead of winter
  • Dog days of the summer
  • Have (one’s) head in the clouds
  • Heavens open
  • In the dark
  • It never rains but it pours
  • Old Man Winter
  • On Cloud Nine
  • On Thin Ice
  • In a Fog
  • Get Wind of
  • (Be) a Breeze
  • Bone Dry
  • Once in a blue moon
  • Perfect Storm
  • Pure as the driven snow
  • Rain Cats And Dogs
  • Rain on Someone’s Parade
  • Right as Rain
  • Soak up the sun
  • Spit into The Wind
  • Steal Someone’s Thunder
  • Stormy relationship
  • Take a Rain Check
  • Three Sheets to the Wind
  • Throw Caution to the Wind
  • To be on thin ice
  • To break the ice
  • To run hot and cold
  • Under the Weather
  • When Hell Freezes Over

Weather Idioms and Sayings in English 

Weather Idioms with Meaning and Examples

Weather Idioms and Sayings (A)

List of idiomatic expressions about the weather that start with A.

(A Breath of) Fresh Air

  • Meaning: Something new and refreshing.
  • Example: The new boss is a breath of fresh air. He’s making positive changes in the company.

(Every Cloud Has a) Silver Lining

  • Meaning: Even in a bad situation, there is something good that can come out of it
  • Example: I didn’t get the job I wanted, but I realized that it wasn’t the right fit for me. Every cloud has a silver lining.

A Cold Day In July

  • Meaning: Something that is unlikely to happen.
  • Example: She said she’ll do it, but I think it’ll happen on a cold day in July.

A snowball’s chance in hell

  • Meaning: Something that is very unlikely to happen.
  • Example: He thinks he can win the race, but he has a snowball’s chance in hell.

A storm in a teacup

  • Meaning: A big fuss over something that is not important.
  • Example: They had a huge argument over the color of the curtains. It was just a storm in a teacup.

All Wet

  • Meaning: Completely wrong.
  • Example: His theory about the economy was all wet.

Weather Idioms and Sayings (B)

List of idiomatic expressions about the weather that start with B.

Be snowed under

  • Meaning: To have too much work to do.
  • Example: I can’t go out tonight. I’m snowed under with work.

Be/feel under the weather

  • Meaning: To feel sick.
  • Example: I’m feeling under the weather today. I think I’m coming down with a cold.

Blood and Thunder

  • Meaning: A dramatic and exciting event.
  • Example: The concert was full of blood and thunder. The crowd went wild!

Blow Hot and Cold

  • Meaning: To be indecisive.
  • Example: He’s blowing hot and cold about the job offer. I don’t think he knows what he wants.

Bolt from the Blue

  • Meaning: Something unexpected.
  • Example: The news that he was getting married was a bolt from the blue.

Brainstorm

  • Meaning: To come up with ideas.
  • Example: Let’s brainstorm some ideas for the new marketing campaign.

Break the ice

  • Meaning: To start a conversation with someone you don’t know.
  • Example: I didn’t know anyone at the party, so I tried to break the ice with some small talk.

Bone Dry

  • Meaning: Completely dry, totally without moisture
  • Example: Several of the smaller rivers and reservoirs in Cape Town are bone dry, and without conservation measures the city could run out of water.

Weather Idioms and Sayings (C)

List of idiomatic expressions about the weather that start with C.

Catch some rays

  • Meaning: To sunbathe.
  • Example: “I’m going to the beach to catch some rays this weekend.”

Chase Rainbows

  • Meaning: To pursue something that is impossible.
  • Example: “He’s been chasing rainbows for years. He needs to be more realistic.”

Cold Day in Hell

  • Meaning: Something that is very unlikely to happen.
  • Example: “I’ll forgive him when it’s a cold day in hell.

Come Hell or High Water

  • Meaning: No matter what happens.
  • Example: “I’ll be at the meeting, come hell or high water.

Come rain or shine

  • Meaning: Whatever happens.
  • Example: “I’ll be at the party, come rain or shine.

Cook Up a Storm

  • Meaning: To cook a lot of food.
  • Example: “She cooked up a storm for the dinner party.”

Weather Idioms and Sayings (D, E, H)

List of idiomatic expressions about the weather that start with D, E, H.

Dead of winter

  • Meaning: The coldest and darkest part of winter.
  • Example: We always try to take a vacation during the dead of winter to escape the cold.

Dog days of the summer

  • Meaning: The hottest and most humid part of summer.
  • Example: I can’t wait for the dog days of summer to be over so I can enjoy the cooler weather.

(Every Cloud Has a) Silver Lining

  • Meaning: A positive aspect of a bad situation
  • Example: The silver lining to the layoffs is that we all have more office space now.

Have (one’s) head in the clouds

  • Meaning: Not know what is happening around you or out of touch with reality
  • Example: My son always has his head in the clouds as he walks home from school.

Heavens open

  • Meaning: A sudden and heavy rainstorm.
  • Example: We were caught in the middle of the park when the heavens opened up and we got soaked.

Weather Idioms and Sayings (I, O)

List of idiomatic expressions about the weather that start with I, O.

In the dark

  • Meaning: Unaware or uninformed about something.
  • Example: I’m completely in the dark about what’s going on with the project.

It never rains but it pours

  • Meaning: When one bad thing happens, many more bad things happen soon after.
  • Example: I lost my job, my car broke down, and my dog ran away all in the same week. It never rains but it pours.

In a Fog

  • Meaning: Confused or unclear about something.
  • Example: I’m still in a fog about what happened at the meeting yesterday

Old Man Winter

  • Meaning: A personification of winter as an old man.
  • Example: Old Man Winter has really been harsh this year with all the snow and ice.

On Cloud Nine

  • Meaning: To be extremely happy or elated.
  • Example: I was on cloud nine when I found out I got accepted into my dream school.

On Thin Ice

  • Meaning: In a risky or dangerous situation.
  • Example: I’m on thin ice with my boss after missing the deadline for the project.

Once in a blue moon

  • Meaning: Rarely or infrequently.
  • Example: I only see my old friend once in a blue moon since she moved to a different state.

Weather Idioms and Sayings (G, P, R)

List of idiomatic expressions about the weather that start with G, P, R.

Get Wind of

  • Meaning: To come to know about something, usually about something that was supposed to be secret.
  • Example: As soon as the press got wind of the scandal, it was all over the news.

Perfect Storm

  • Meaning: A situation where several circumstances or events come together to create an extraordinarily bad or problematic situation.
  • Example: Losing my job right when the rent was due was a perfect storm for my financial situation.

Pure as the Driven Snow

  • Meaning: To describe someone or something as being morally impeccable or innocent.
  • Example: Despite the accusations, his supporters see him as pure as the driven snow.

Rain Cats and Dogs

  • Meaning: To rain very heavily.
  • Example: You should take an umbrella; it’s raining cats and dogs out there!

Rain on Someone’s Parade

  • Meaning: To spoil someone’s plans or dampen their enthusiasm.
  • Example: I hate to rain on your parade, but I have to inform you that the park is closed today, so the picnic will have to be postponed.

Right as Rain

  • Meaning: To feel well or in good health; everything is correct or satisfactory.
  • Example: After a good night’s sleep, I felt right as rain and ready to tackle the day.

Weather Idioms and Sayings (S)

List of idiomatic expressions about the weather that start with S.

Soak Up the Sun

  • Meaning: To enjoy the sunshine, typically by spending time sunbathing or outdoors.
  • Example: I can’t wait for our beach vacation to just relax and soak up the sun.

Spit into the Wind

  • Meaning: To do something that is futile or counterproductive, or to waste one’s efforts.
  • Example: Arguing with him is like spitting into the wind; he never listens to reason.

Steal Someone’s Thunder

  • Meaning: To take the attention or praise away from someone else, often by doing something similar or better.
  • Example: I didn’t mean to steal your thunder by announcing my engagement at your birthday party.

Stormy Relationship

  • Meaning: A relationship characterized by frequent arguments, turbulence, or instability.
  • Example: They had a stormy relationship, with passionate highs and explosive lows.

Weather Idioms and Sayings (T, U, W)

List of idiomatic expressions about the weather that start with T, U, W.

Take a Rain Check

  • Meaning: To politely decline an offer or invitation but suggest that one might accept it at a later time.
  • Example: I can’t make it to your party this Saturday, but can I take a rain check and come by next time?

Three Sheets to the Wind

  • Meaning: To be very drunk or intoxicated.
  • Example: After his fifth drink, he was three sheets to the wind and could barely stand straight.

Throw Caution to the Wind

  • Meaning: To act recklessly or without regard for potential consequences.
  • Example: She threw caution to the wind and invested all her savings in a dubious start-up.

To be on Thin Ice

  • Meaning: To be in a risky, precarious, or sensitive situation.
  • Example: He’s on thin ice with his boss after coming in late for the third time this week.

To Break the Ice

  • Meaning: To initiate conversation or social interaction in an initially awkward or tense situation.
  • Example: To break the ice at the start of the meeting, the host told a humorous anecdote.

To Run Hot and Cold

  • Meaning: To be inconsistent, especially in one’s emotions or behavior.
  • Example: Her feelings for him seem to run hot and cold; one minute she’s all over him, and the next, she’s completely distant.

Under the Weather

  • Meaning: To feel ill or not well.
  • Example: I’m feeling a bit under the weather today, so I think I’ll stay in bed.

When Hell Freezes Over

  • Meaning: Never; it implies that something is so unlikely that it will never happen.
  • Example: He said he’d clean his room when hell freezes over, so I’m not holding my breath.

Weather Idioms and Sayings in English | Images

Weather idioms

Weather Idioms Video

Learn weather idioms and sayings with American English pronunciation.