Concrete Nouns: Useful List of 400+ Concrete Nouns

Last Updated on November 14, 2023

Concrete nouns are the building blocks of our everyday language, allowing us to communicate about the world around us in a clear and concise manner. From the simplest objects like pencils and chairs, to more complex ones like buildings and vehicles, concrete nouns play a crucial role in our ability to describe and understand the world.

In this article, we will explore the definition of concrete nouns, their characteristics, and examples of how they are used in everyday language. Learn concrete noun definition (nouns that you can see, hear,  smell, taste and touch) and useful list of 400+ concrete nouns in English with us now!  

What Is a Concrete Noun?

Concrete Nouns in EnglishPin

What is a concrete noun? Concrete nouns are people, places, or things that we can experience with our five senses (taste, touch, sight, hearing, or smell).

For example, in the sentence “She put the book on the table.“, the noun book and table are concrete nouns. You can touch it, see it, and maybe even smell it. In the sentence “This music always makes me sad.“, music can’t be touched but you can hear the music. Therefore, It’s a concrete noun.

Concrete nouns can be divided into common nouns and proper nouns.

  • A Common noun is a noun that’s not the name of any particular person, place, or thing.
  • A Proper noun (proper name) is a noun that refers to a specific person, place, or thing (London, San Francisco, Mary, Titanic).

Concrete nouns can be also classified into five types:

  • Common concrete nouns: These are nouns that refer to everyday objects, such as “chair,” “table,” “car,” and “phone.”
  • Proper concrete nouns: These are nouns that refer to specific people, places, or things, such as “John,” “London,” “Eiffel Tower,” and “Coca-Cola.”
  • Collective concrete nouns: These are nouns that refer to a group of objects, people, or animals, such as “herd,” “flock,” “team,” and “family.”
  • Countable concrete nouns: These are nouns that can be counted, such as “book,” “pen,” “apple,” and “car.”
  • Uncountable concrete nouns: These are nouns that cannot be counted, such as “water,” “sand,” “music,” and “knowledge.”

Concrete Nouns List from A-Z

  • Apple
  • Air
  • Conditioner
  • Airport
  • Ambulance
  • Aircraft
  • Apartment
  • Arrow
  • Antlers
  • Apron
  • Alligator
  • Architect
  • Ankle
  • Armchair
  • Aunt
  • Ball
  • Bermudas
  • Beans
  • Balloon
  • Bear
  • Blouse
  • Bed
  • Bow
  • Bread
  • Black
  • Board
  • Bones
  • Bill
  • Bitterness
  • Boxers
  • Belt
  • Brain
  • Buffalo
  • Bird
  • Baby
  • Book
  • Back
  • Butter
  • Bulb
  • Buckles
  • Bat
  • Bank
  • Bag
  • Bra
  • Boots
  • Blazer
  • Bikini
  • Bookcase
  • Bookstore
  • Bus stop
  • Brass
  • Brother
  • Boy
  • Blender
  • Bucket
  • Bakery
  • Bow
  • Bridge
  • Boat
  • Car
  • Cow
  • Cap
  • Cooker
  • Cheeks
  • Cheese
  • Credenza
  • Carpet
  • Crow
  • Crest
  • Chest
  • Chair
  • Candy
  • Cabinet
  • Cat
  • Coffee
  • Children
  • Cookware
  • Chaise longue
  • Chicken
  • Casino
  • Cabin
  • Castle
  • Church
  • Cafe
  • Cinema
  • Choker
  • Cravat
  • Cane
  • Costume
  • Cardigan
  • Chocolate
  • Crib
  • Couch
  • Cello
  • Cashier
  • Composer
  • Cave
  • Country
  • Computer
  • Canoe
  • Clock
  • Charlie (U.K)
  • Dog
  • Deer
  • Donkey
  • Desk
  • Desktop
  • Dress
  • Dolphin
  • Doctor
  • Dentist
  • Drum
  • Dresser
  • Designer
  • Detective
  • Daughter
  • Egg
  • Elephant
  • Earrings
  • Ears
  • Eyes
  • Estate
  • Finger
  • Fox
  • Frock
  • Frog
  • Fan
  • Freezer
  • Fish
  • Film
  • Foot
  • Flag
  • Factory
  • Father
  • Farm
  • Forest
  • Flower
  • Fruit
  • Fork
  • Grapes
  • Goat
  • Gown
  • Garlic
  • Ginger
  • Giraffe
  • Gauva
  • Grains
  • Gas station
  • Garage
  • Gloves
  • Glasses
  • Gift
  • Galaxy
  • Guitar
  • Grandmother
  • Grandfather
  • Governor
  • Girl
  • Guest
  • Hamburger
  • Hand
  • Head
  • Hair
  • Heart
  • House
  • Horse
  • Hen
  • Horn
  • Hat
  • Hammer
  • Hostel
  • Hospital
  • Hotel
  • Heels
  • Herbs
  • Host
  • Jacket
  • Jersey
  • Jewelry
  • Jaw
  • Jumper
  • Judge
  • Juicer
  • Keyboard
  • Kid
  • Kangaroo
  • Koala
  • Knife
  • Lemon
  • Lion
  • Leggings
  • Leg
  • Laptop
  • Library
  • Lamb
  • London
  • Lips
  • Lung
  • Lighter
  • Luggage
  • Lamp
  • Lawyer
  • Mouse
  • Monkey
  • Mouth
  • Mango
  • Mobile
  • Milk
  • Music
  • Mirror
  • Musician
  • Mother
  • Man
  • Model
  • Mall
  • Museum
  • Market
  • Moonlight
  • Medicine
  • Microscope
  • Newspaper
  • Nose
  • Notebook
  • Neck
  • Noodles
  • Nurse
  • Necklace
  • Noise
  • Ocean
  • Ostrich
  • Oil
  • Orange
  • Onion
  • Oven
  • Owl
  • Paper
  • Panda
  • Pants
  • Palm
  • Pasta
  • Pumpkin
  • Pharmacist
  • Potato
  • Parfume
  • Panther
  • Pad
  • Pencil
  • Pipe
  • Police
  • Pen
  • Pharmacy
  • Petrol station
  • Police station
  • Parrot
  • Plane
  • Pigeon
  • Phone
  • Peacock
  • Pencil
  • Pig
  • Pouch
  • Pagoda
  • Pyramid
  • Purse
  • Pancake
  • Popcorn
  • Piano
  • Physician
  • Photographer
  • Professor
  • Painter
  • Park
  • Plant
  • Parfume
  • Radio
  • Razor
  • Ribs
  • Rainbow
  • Ring
  • Rabbit
  • Rice
  • Refrigerator
  • Remote
  • Restaurant
  • Road
  • Surgeon
  • Scale
  • Shampoo
  • Sink
  • Salt
  • Shark
  • Sandals
  • Shoulder
  • Spoon
  • Soap
  • Sand
  • Sheep
  • Sari
  • Stomach
  • Stairs
  • Soup
  • Shoes
  • Scissors
  • Sparrow
  • Shirt
  • Suitcase
  • Stove
  • Stairs
  • Snowman
  • Shower
  • Swan
  • Suit
  • Sweater
  • Smoke
  • Skirt
  • Sofa
  • Socks
  • Stadium
  • Skyscraper
  • School
  • Sunglasses
  • Sandals
  • Slippers
  • Shorts
  • Sandwich
  • Strawberry
  • Spaghetti
  • Shrimp
  • Saxophone
  • Sister
  • Son
  • Singer
  • Senator
  • Street
  • Supermarket
  • Swimming pool
  • Star
  • Sky
  • Sun
  • Spoon
  • Ship
  • Smile
  • Table
  • Turkey
  • Tie
  • Toes
  • Truck
  • Train
  • Taxi
  • Tiger
  • Trousers
  • Tongue
  • Television
  • Teacher
  • Turtle
  • Tablet
  • Train station
  • Toothpaste
  • Tail
  • Theater
  • Trench coat
  • Tea
  • Tomato
  • Teen
  • Tunnel
  • Temple
  • Town
  • Toothbrush
  • Tree
  • Toy
  • Tissue
  • Telephone
  • Underwear
  • Uncle
  • Umbrella
  • Vest
  • Voice
  • Veterinarian
  • Villa
  • Violin
  • Village
  • Vehicle
  • Vase
  • Wallet
  • Wolf
  • Waist
  • Wrist
  • Water melon
  • Whale
  • Water
  • Wings
  • Whisker
  • Watch
  • Woman
  • Washing machine
  • Wheelchair
  • Waiter
  • Wound
  • Xylophone
  • Zebra
  • Zoo

Nouns That Can be Either Concrete and Abstract

Some nouns can be both concrete and abstract depending on their usage and context. Here are a few examples:

  • Love: Love is an abstract concept that cannot be touched or seen, but it can be felt and experienced. However, love can also be used as a concrete noun to refer to a person, place, or thing that is cherished or adored, such as “my love for chocolate.”
  • Time: Time is an abstract concept that cannot be touched or seen, but it can be measured and experienced. However, time can also be used as a concrete noun to refer to a specific moment or period, such as “the time I spent in Paris.”
  • Memory: Memory is an abstract concept that cannot be touched or seen, but it can be recalled and experienced. However, memory can also be used as a concrete noun to refer to a physical object that stores information, such as “my computer’s memory.”
  • Freedom: Freedom is an abstract concept that cannot be touched or seen, but it can be experienced and valued. However, freedom can also be used as a concrete noun to refer to a physical state or condition, such as “the freedom to move.”

Other examples: 

  • Light – can refer to a physical object or to an abstract concept of illumination or understanding.
  • Power – can refer to physical strength or energy, or to an abstract concept of authority or influence.
  • Space – can refer to a physical location or to an abstract concept of distance or emptiness.
  • Sound – can refer to a physical vibration or to an abstract concept of communication or expression.
  • Mind – can refer to a physical organ or to an abstract concept of consciousness or thought.
  • Justice – can refer to a physical system of laws or to an abstract concept of fairness or equality.

Concrete Nouns Images

Examples of Concrete Nouns in English | Picture 2

Concrete Nouns in EnglishPin

Concrete Nouns List | Picture 3

Concrete Nouns in EnglishPin

Concrete Nouns List in English | Picture 4

Concrete Nouns in EnglishPin

Frequently Asked Questions

What are the differences between concrete and abstract nouns?

Concrete nouns refer to physical entities that can be perceived with the senses, while abstract nouns refer to ideas, concepts, or emotions that cannot be seen or touched.

What are some types of concrete nouns?

There are several types of concrete nouns, including material nouns (such as “wood” and “metal”), countable nouns (such as “chair” and “book”), and uncountable nouns (such as “water” and “sand”).

How are concrete nouns used in sentences?

Concrete nouns can be used in sentences as subjects, objects, or complements. For example, “The dog chased the ball” uses “dog” as the subject, “ball” as the object, and “chased” as the verb.

What are some examples of abstract nouns?

Some examples of abstract nouns include “love,” “happiness,” “freedom,” and “justice.” These nouns refer to concepts or ideas that cannot be perceived with the senses.

68 thoughts on “Concrete Nouns: Useful List of 400+ Concrete Nouns”

  1. I like the the way that you are helping us in our serious question and I congratulate you for this and I thanked you💗🤗🤗🤗

    Reply
    • Thanks for your question! The word “tour” can be either a concrete noun or an abstract noun, depending on the context in which it is used. When “tour” refers to a physical journey or trip taken by a person or group, it is a concrete noun. However, when “tour” refers to a specific activity or performance, such as a musical tour or a book tour, it is an abstract noun. So, whether “tour” is a concrete or abstract noun depends on the specific meaning of the word in the given context. I hope that helps clarify things for you!

      Reply

Leave a Comment