Days of The Week in English with Useful Rules and Examples

Days of the week! When you are talking about events that are taking place, meeting people and other things involving time, it is very important to be able to refer to the days in the week. These are simple and easy to learn in the English language and in this article, we are going to be taking a look at how to say the seven days of the week in English and looking at how they might be used in a sentence.

Names of The Days Of The Week

There are 7 days in the week and in English each of the end in the suffix -day. Let’s take a look at these now.

  • Monday
  • Tuesday
  • Wednesday
  • Thursday
  • Friday
  • Saturday
  • Sunday

When writing the days in the week, you must always use a capital letter at the beginning. This is because these words are proper nouns that always require capitalizing.

Days Of The Week In The Present

There are many times in which you might want to use the names of the days of the week in your English writing or during your spoken conversation. We are now going to take a look at some examples of the days of the week being used in present tense sentences.

  • On Thursday we go to the pub.
  • Sunday is always the day that we attend church.
  • I only work on Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
  • Thursday’s are when my mother comes for dinner.
  • Kate and Robert go to the theatre every Friday evening.
  • On Saturday morning, I go for a run.
  • Is John working this Monday?

Days Of The Week In The Past

If you are talking about an event that happened on a specific day in the past, there are various ways in which you might do this in conjunction with the name of the day. We are now going to look at some example sentences of the days of the week being referred to in the past.

  • Last Sunday I went to the market.
  • On the Thursday before last, we saw my friend, Mike.
  • Two weeks ago on Monday was the day that I started my new job.
  • Last Wednesday my father won the lottery.

Days Of The Week In The Future

When we are talking about something which is going to happen on a certain day in the future, there are other ways to do so. We are now going to take a look at some ways of referring to the days of the week in the future.

  • Next Tuesday I will go swimming.
  • A week on Sunday it will be my birthday.
  • The following Tuesday it will be Christmas day.
  • Are you seeing your family this coming Friday?

Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow

When we are talking about the days of the week, we do not always need to refer to the days of the week by name, we might use the following:

  • Yesterday – This is the day before the current day.
  • Today – The current day.
  • Tomorrow – The day after the current day.

Let’s now take a look at some examples of sentences featuring these words.

  • Tomorrow I am going on holiday to Greece.
  • The day before yesterday was my mother’s birthday.
  • Are you coming to the party today?
  • Did you see Alan yesterday?

Shortened Days Of The Week

Quite often when reading English writing, you will notice that the days of the week are often written in their shortened form. This is quite common in informal writing such as email and text, note-taking and in diaries and planners amongst other things. We are now going to take a look at each of the shortened forms of the days of the week.

  • Mon
  • Tues
  • Weds
  • Thurs
  • Fri
  • Sat
  • Sun

As you can see, each one is easily recognizable against its full name and so can be easily learned and remembered.

Conclusion

Learning the days of the week in English is an excellent way of being able to add useful vocabulary when talking about situations relating to time and when certain events have happened. As well as the days of the week themselves, it is important to know how to refer to certain days without using their name and making use of words such as tomorrow and yesterday.

The Days Of The Week Infographic

Days of The Week in English with Useful Rules and Examples

Days of The Week Video

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