Distilled Water vs. Purified Water: Differences Between these Common Terms

Curious about the dissimilarities between “distilled water” and “purified water”? These terms might seem similar, but they actually have different meanings. Let’s explore the differences between “distilled water” and “purified water” to gain a clearer understanding of these common terms.

The Main Difference Between Distilled Water and Purified Water

Distilled Water vs. Purified Water: Differences Between these Common Terms

Distilled Water vs. Purified Water: Key Takeaways

  • Distilled Water: Produced by boiling water and condensing the steam back into a liquid to remove impurities and minerals.
  • Purified Water: Treated to remove chemicals and pathogens through methods like reverse osmosis, distillation, or deionization.

Distilled Water vs. Purified Water: The Definition

What Does Distilled Water Mean?

Distilled water refers to water that has undergone a process of distillation, which involves heating the water to create steam, then condensing the steam back into liquid form. This process effectively removes impurities, minerals, and contaminants from the water, resulting in a purer form of water. Distilled water is free from many dissolved solids and other substances, making it suitable for various applications where high-purity water is required, such as in laboratory experiments, medical procedures, and certain industrial processes.

The distillation process removes most impurities, including minerals, bacteria, and organic compounds, producing water that is relatively neutral in pH and free from the taste and odor often associated with tap water. Due to its high purity, distilled water is often used in situations where the presence of impurities could interfere with the desired outcome, such as in steam irons, car batteries, and medical devices.

What Does Purified Water Mean?

Purified water refers to water that has undergone a process to remove impurities and contaminants, resulting in a high level of purity. This process typically involves several purification methods such as distillation, deionization, reverse osmosis, or carbon filtration to eliminate chemicals, bacteria, and other pollutants. The goal is to produce water that meets specific purity standards set by regulatory bodies, making it suitable for various applications, including drinking, pharmaceutical production, laboratory use, and industrial processes.

Purified water is free from visible particles, odors, and tastes, and it is often considered a clean and safe option for consumption and other purposes.

Distilled Water vs. Purified Water: Usage

Distilled Water

  • Often used in medical facilities and laboratories.
  • Suitable for lead-acid batteries and steam irons.

Purified Water:

  • Typically used for drinking water.
  • Found in various bottled water brands.

Tips to Remember the Differences

  • Distilled water is specifically steam-condensed, usually devoid of all minerals.
  • Purified water includes distilled water but also covers other methods of purification.

Distilled Water vs. Purified Water: Examples

Example Sentences Using Distilled Water

  • When you’re setting up your aquarium, use distilled water to avoid introducing any impurities that could harm your fish.
  • It’s important to fill your car’s battery with distilled water only, as minerals in other types of water could shorten the battery’s lifespan.
  • The medical equipment must be cleaned with distilled water to ensure sterility.
  • Distilled water is commonly used in humidifiers to prevent mineral dust from dispersing into the air.
  • When making homemade cosmetics, it’s important to use distilled water to avoid bacterial contamination.

Example Sentences Using Purified Water

  • Purified water is essential for maintaining the performance of laboratory equipment.
  • The fish tank should be filled with purified water to ensure the health of the aquatic pets.
  • Purified water is often used in cosmetic products to maintain their purity and quality.
  • Ensure you’re drinking purified water during your overseas trip to prevent waterborne illnesses that can occur from unknown contaminants.
  • You might find that your home coffee tastes better when made with purified water, as it’s free from chlorine and heavy metals that can alter the flavor.

Related Confused Words

Spring Water vs. Purified Water

Spring water and purified water differ in their sources and treatment processes:

Spring Water:

  • Sourced from natural springs and underground formations.
  • May contain minerals and other trace elements from the geological formations it passes through.
  • Typically undergoes minimal processing, mainly filtration to remove large particles and sediment.
  • The mineral content can vary based on the specific spring source.
  • Often marketed as a natural and refreshing option due to its perceived purity and mineral content.

Purified Water:

  • Sourced from various sources such as tap water, wells, or springs, and then processed to remove impurities.
  • Undergoes rigorous purification processes such as distillation, deionization, reverse osmosis, or carbon filtration to eliminate contaminants.
  • The purification process removes minerals, chemicals, and microorganisms, resulting in a high level of purity.
  • Often used in applications where the presence of minerals or impurities is undesirable, such as in medical settings, laboratories, and manufacturing processes.
  • Can be further treated to meet specific purity standards set by regulatory bodies, making it suitable for consumption and various industrial and commercial uses.

Mineral Water vs. Distilled Water

Mineral water and distilled water differ in their composition and production processes:

Mineral Water:

  • Sourced from natural springs or wells and contains various minerals and trace elements, such as calcium, magnesium, and potassium, which are acquired as the water passes through rock formations.
  • Regulated to contain a specific amount of minerals and trace elements, providing potential health benefits and a distinct taste.
  • Typically undergoes minimal processing, primarily filtration to remove sediment and larger particles, while retaining its natural mineral content.
  • Often marketed as a natural and healthy drinking water option due to its mineral composition and perceived health benefits.

Distilled Water:

  • Created through the process of distillation, which involves boiling water to produce steam, then condensing the steam back into liquid form, leaving behind impurities and minerals.
  • The distillation process effectively removes minerals, chemicals, and contaminants, resulting in a high level of purity.
  • Used in applications where the presence of minerals and impurities is undesirable, such as in medical settings, laboratories, and certain industrial processes.
  • Often considered a neutral and pure form of water, free from minerals and impurities.