Everytime vs. Every Time: What’s the Correct Usage

Confused about when to use “everytime” and “every time”? Many English learners struggle with this common dilemma. Understanding the difference can help you communicate more effectively and avoid common mistakes. In this article, we’ll explore the distinction between these two similar-sounding phrases to help you use them correctly in your writing and speaking.

The Main Difference Between Everytime and Every Time

Everytime vs. Every Time: What’s the Correct Usage Pin

Everytime vs. Every Time: Key Takeaways

  • Every time: A two-word phrase used correctly in English.
  • Everytime: A common misspelling, not recognized as a standard word.

Everytime vs. Every Time: The Definition

What Does Everytime Mean?

Everytime is a misspelling and is not included in standard English dictionaries. You should avoid using it in formal writing. 

  • Incorrect example: I brush my teeth everytime after meals.

What Does Every Time Mean?

Every time is a phrase used to indicate the occurrence of an event or action on each occasion or instance. It signifies regularity or frequency, emphasizing that something happens consistently or without fail.

  • For example, “She sings beautifully every time she performs.”

The phrase “every time” is commonly used to express the idea of repetition or consistency in various contexts, such as daily routines, recurring events, or habitual actions. It is important to use these two words together to convey this specific meaning accurately in written and spoken English.

Tips to Remember the Differences

  • Remember every time as two distinct words like “every instance”.
  • Associate everytime with common writing errors and remind yourself it’s not a recognized word.

Everytime vs. Every Time: Examples

Example 1:

  • Correct: My phone rings every time I start cooking dinner.
  • Incorrect: My phone rings everytime I start cooking dinner.

Example 2:

  • Correct: Ensure you turn off the lights every time you exit a room.
  • Incorrect: Ensure you turn off the lights everytime you exit a room.

Example 3:

  • Correct: She smiles every time her favorite song plays on the radio.
  • Incorrect: She smiles everytime her favorite song plays on the radio.

Example 4:

  • Correct: She feels a sense of nostalgia every time she visits her childhood home.
  • Incorrect: She feels a sense of nostalgia everytime she visits her childhood home.

Example 5:

  • Correct: He forgets his keys every time he rushes out the door.
  • Incorrect: He forgets his keys everytime he rushes out the door.

Example 6:

  • Correct: The flowers bloom beautifully every time it rains.
  • Incorrect: The flowers bloom beautifully everytime it rains.

Example 7:

  • Correct: Every time I visit the beach, I feel a sense of peace and tranquility.
  • Incorrect: Everytime I visit the beach, I feel a sense of peace and tranquility.

Example 8:

  • Correct: The computer crashes every time I try to open that particular program.
  • Incorrect: The computer crashes everytime I try to open that particular program.

Related Confused Words

Every time vs Each time

“Every time” and “each time” are both used to indicate each occurrence of an event or action, but they are used in slightly different contexts.

Every time” is used to emphasize the regularity or frequency of an action or event. It suggests that the action or event occurs consistently or without exception. For example, “She sings the same song every time she takes a shower.”

Each time” is used to emphasize individual occurrences within a series. It highlights the specific instances of an action or event. For example, “He gives her a flower each time they meet.”

In summary, “every time” emphasizes the regularity or consistency of an action, while “each time” emphasizes the individual occurrences within a series. Both phrases are used to convey the idea of repetition, but the emphasis and nuance differ slightly.

Every time vs. Anytime

“Every time” and “anytime” are two different phrases that are used in distinct contexts in the English language.

Every time” is used to emphasize the regularity or frequency of an action or event. It indicates that the action or event occurs consistently or without exception. For example, “She gets a little emotional every time she watches that movie.”

Anytime,” on the other hand, is used to indicate an indefinite or unrestricted time. It suggests that something is possible or permissible at any time, without restriction. For example, “You can call me anytime if you need help.”

In short, “every time” emphasizes the regularity or consistency of an action, while “anytime” emphasizes the idea of an indefinite or unrestricted time for something to occur.

Frequently Asked Questions

What distinguishes ‘every time’ from ‘everytime’ in usage?

‘Every time’ is the correct form, used as an adverbial phrase meaning ‘each time’ or ‘without exception.’ ‘Everytime’ is often mistakenly used but is not recognized as a standard word in English.

Can you provide examples to clarify ‘every time’ versus ‘everytime’?

Certainly. Correct usage: “Every time I visit, she makes her famous apple pie.” Incorrect: “Everytime I visit, she makes her famous apple pie.”

In which contexts is ‘every time’ the correct form to use?

‘Every time’ should be used in all contexts where you refer to each occurrence of an event or action. For instance, “Every time the phone rings, the dog barks.”

What is the grammatical explanation for the separation in ‘every time’?

The separation in ‘every time’ is because it is a two-word adverbial phrase. ‘Every’ is an adjective clarifying the noun ‘time,’ and together they describe the frequency of an event.

How does the use of ‘every time’ differ between American and British English?

There is no difference in the usage of ‘every time’ between American and British English; in both variants, ‘every time’ is the correct construction and ‘everytime’ is incorrect.

How do ‘every time’ and ‘whenever’ vary in meaning and application?

‘Every time’ is used to emphasize each specific occasion, often in a consistent sequence. ‘Whenever’ is more general and implies any time at all or no matter when. For example, you might say, “Every time it snows, the city halts,” versus “Whenever it snows, the children make snowmen.”

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Last Updated on January 9, 2024

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