23 Friendship Idioms: Companionship Phrases You Should Know

Exploring friendship idioms offers us a window into the depth of human connections and the roles we play in each other’s lives. We use expressions like “a friend in need is a friend indeed” to express the importance of standing by each other during tough times, suggesting that the true test of friendship is support when it’s most needed. Similarly, “Birds of a Feather Flock Together” highlights how our friendships often form through shared interests and characteristics.

What are Friendship Idioms?

In our language, friendship idioms are phrases that capture the intricacies of relationships in a few words. We use these expressions to convey our experiences and emotions about friendships in a way that’s easy for others to understand.

Common Friendship Idioms

We often rely on idioms as linguistic shortcuts to express something complex about our social bonds. Here’s a glance at some popular ones:

  • A friend in need is a friend indeed: Shows that true friends are there in difficult times.
  • To hit it off: Describes the start of a great friendship with immediate good rapport.
  • Like two peas in a pod: Used when two friends are very similar or always together.
  • To be as thick as thieves: Implies friends share deep bonds and possibly secrets.
  • To bury the hatchet: Refers to resolving a dispute and restoring friendship.

23 Friendship Idioms: Companionship Phrases You Should Know

List of Friendship Idioms

Idiom
A friend in need is a friend indeed Birds of a feather flock together
To hit it off Fair-weather friend
Like two peas in a pod Friends in high places
To be as thick as thieves To be joined at the hip
To bury the hatchet To have someone’s back
A shoulder to cry on Through thick and thin
To be on the same wavelength To bond over something
To go back a long way To see eye to eye
An old flame To stand by someone
To take under one’s wing To be someone’s right-hand man (or woman)
Two heads are better than one To be in someone’s corner
To click with someone

Friendship Idioms with Meaning and Example

Idioms Meanings and Example Sentences
Birds of a feather flock together People with similar interests or characteristics tend to associate with each other.

Example: “They’re always together at social events—birds of a feather flock together.

Fair-weather friend A person who is only a friend in good times but disappears in times of trouble.

Example: “As soon as I lost my job, I learned who my fair-weather friends were.”

Friends in high places Having friends in influential positions.

Example: “She got the job easily thanks to some friends in high places.

To be joined at the hip To be very close or inseparable friends.

Example: “Those two are always together; they’re practically joined at the hip.

To have someone’s back To be prepared to support or defend someone.

Example: “Don’t worry about the meeting—I have your back.

A shoulder to cry on Someone willing to listen to your problems and provide comfort.

Example: “Whenever I’m upset, I know she’ll be a shoulder to cry on.

Through thick and thin Staying supportive or loyal in good times and bad.

Example: “We’ve been friends through thick and thin.

To be on the same wavelength To understand and agree with each other.

Example: “We don’t even need to finish our sentences—we’re always on the same wavelength.

To bond over something To develop a close relationship because of a shared interest or experience.

Example: “They bonded over their love for hiking.”

To go back a long way To have known each other for a long time.

Example: “We go back a long way; we’ve been friends since childhood.”

To see eye to eye To agree with each other.

Example: “It’s nice that we always see eye to eye on the important things.”

An old flame A person with whom one once had a romantic relationship.

Example: “He bumped into an old flame at the reunion.”

To stand by someone To support or remain loyal to someone, especially in difficult times.

Example: “No matter what happens, I’ll stand by you.

To take under one’s wing To help, guide, or protect someone.

Example: “The experienced teacher took the new hire under her wing.

Two heads are better than one It’s beneficial to have two people working on a problem instead of one.

Example: “Let’s work together on this—two heads are better than one.

To be in someone’s corner To support someone, especially during a difficult time or when they are involved in a conflict.

Example: “It’s good to know you’re in my corner.

To click with someone To immediately like and get along well with someone.

Example: “We just clicked the first time we met.”

To be someone’s right-hand man (or woman) To be the primary helper or assistant to someone.

Example: “She’s always been my right-hand woman in the business.”

Friendship Idioms in Different Contexts

A friend in need is a friend indeed

  • In Loyalty: When someone supports a friend during difficult times.

Example: “When I was sick, she was the only one who visited me—a friend in need is a friend indeed.”

  • In Recognizing True Friends: When distinguishing between fair-weather friends and true friends.

Example: “He always helps me out when things get tough. He’s a friend in need is a friend indeed.”

To hit it off

  • In Social Encounters: When two people find they have a lot in common and enjoy each other’s company.

Example: “They met at the party and hit it off; they’ve been inseparable since.”

  • In Forming New Relationships: When two individuals connect well and establish rapport easily.

Example: “Our new coworkers hit it off right from the start, which is great for team morale.”

Like two peas in a pod

  • In Similarity: When emphasizing the closeness or similarity between friends.

Example: “The twins are like two peas in a pod, with nearly identical interests and ideas.”

  • In Compatibility: When two people are well-matched in their tastes or behaviors.

Example: “My best friend and I are like two peas in a pod; we always know what the other is thinking.”

To be as thick as thieves

  • In Close Friendships: When describing a deep, almost conspiratorial, friendship.

Example: “They’ve been as thick as thieves since they were children, always sticking up for each other.”

  • In Trust: When two people trust each other enough to share private information.

Example: “The two colleagues are as thick as thieves and often collaborate on projects outside of work.”

To bury the hatchet

  • In Reconciliation: When former adversaries decide to put aside their differences.

Example: “After years of rivalry, the two companies decided to bury the hatchet and work together.”

  • In Forgiveness: When individuals choose to forgive each other and move on from past conflicts.

Example: “It’s time we buried the hatchet and put that argument behind us.”

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