6 Phrasal Verbs with BACK: A Comprehensive Guide

Phrasal verbs are an essential part of the English language, and they can often be a source of confusion for non-native speakers. One group of phrasal verbs that can be particularly tricky is those that include the word “back.” In this article, we will explore the various meanings and uses of phrasal verbs with “back,” providing examples and explanations to help you better understand and use them in your everyday communication. Whether you’re a student, a professional, or simply someone looking to improve your English skills, this guide will help you master these essential phrasal verbs and communicate more effectively in English.

Phrasal Verbs with BACK

Useful phrasal verbs with BACK.Pin

Back Away

Back away

  • Meaning: The phrasal verb “back away” means to move away backwards from somebody/something that is frightening or unpleasant or to retreat or go backwards.
  • Example: You should back away from the edge of the cliff.

Back away

  • Meaning: To avoid doing something that is unpleasant or to withdraw from a situation.
  • Example: He backed away from the project when he realized how much work it would involve.

Back down

Back down

  • Meaning: To withdraw from a demand, an opinion, or a position that others are strongly opposing. 
  • Example: You should back down and apologize to your friend for your rude behavior yesterday.

Back down

  • Meaning: To admit defeat in a situation where you previously held a strong position.
  • Example: The company had to back down from its decision to lay off employees due to public pressure.

Back off 

Back off

  • Meaning: To retreat from a confrontational stance or position, especially after displaying a strong commitment to take action
  • Example: The bully finally backed off when the teacher intervened.

Back off

  • Meaning: To decrease the intensity or level of a particular setting or parameter
  • Example: The chef asked the cook to back off the heat on the stove.

Back onto 

Back onto

  • Meaning: To maneuver a vehicle in reverse until it is positioned onto a particular surface or area
  • Example: The driver backed onto the driveway to park the car.

Back onto

  • Meaning: Overlook something from the rear
  • Example: The balcony of the hotel room backs onto a beautiful garden.

Back out

Back out

  • Meaning: Reverse a vehicle from a confined space
  • Example: The truck backed out of the loading bay after unloading the cargo.

Back out

  • Meaning: To retract one’s commitment” or “to pull out of an agreement
  • Example: The athlete had to back out of the competition due to an injury.

Back out

  • Meaning: To revert or to go back to a previous state
  • Example: The software allows you to back out of any changes made to a document.

Back up

Back up

  • Meaning: Move backwards, especially for a vehicle to do so
  • Example: Can you back up the car a little bit so I can get out?

Back up

  • Meaning: Move a vehicle backward
  • Example: I always back up my truck when I need to turn around in a narrow street.

Back up

  • Meaning: To retract or undo one’s actions
  • Example: They are backing up their decision to cancel the event because of the weather.

Back up

  • Meaning: To rethink or review one’s thoughts
  • Example: After listening to the feedback, I decided to back up my original idea.

Back up

  • Meaning: To make a backup or to create a duplicate copy for safekeeping
  • Example: Can you back up your files to the server so that we can access them remotely?

Back up

  • Meaning: Provide support or the promise of support
  • Example: They are backing up their team by providing them with the necessary resources.

Back up

  • Meaning: To block or to impede progress
  • ExampleThe dam was built to back up the flow of the river and create a reservoir.

Phrasal Verbs with BACK | Image

Phrasal Verbs with BACKPin

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Last Updated on November 18, 2023

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3 thoughts on “6 Phrasal Verbs with BACK: A Comprehensive Guide”

  1. Recently I hear (on television) “back in” being used where “back up” would seem to me to be more appropriate since the contextual meaning is “to support”.

    Is this, perhaps, an American usage?

    Reply

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