7 Phrasal Verbs with Jump in English

Last Updated on November 18, 2023

Phrasal verbs with “jump” can be tricky because there are so many of them, and their meanings can be quite different from the literal meaning of the word “jump.” In this article, we’ll provide a list of phrasal verbs with “jump” and their meanings, along with examples of how to use them in context. Whether you’re a beginner or an advanced learner of English, this guide will help you master this important aspect of the language. So let’s jump right in!

Understanding Phrasal Verbs

phrasal verbs with JUMPPin

Definition and Importance

Phrasal verbs are a combination of a verb and a preposition or adverb. They are commonly used in English language and can be challenging to understand for non-native speakers. Phrasal verbs can have multiple meanings based on the context in which they are used.

In the case of phrasal verbs with “jump,” they can have different meanings depending on the preposition or adverb used with the verb. For example, “jump off” means to jump from a higher position to a lower one, while “jump on” means to criticize or scold someone harshly.

It is important to note that phrasal verbs are often used in informal speech and writing, and can vary by region or dialect. Therefore, it is essential to understand the context in which they are used to avoid misunderstandings.

List of Phrasal Verbs with JUMP 

  • Jump At
  • Jump Down
  • Jump In
  • Jump Off
  • Jump On
  • Jump Out
  • Jump Up

Phrasal Verbs with JUMP: Meaning and Examples

Jump At

Jump At

Meaning: “Jump at” is a phrasal verb that means to eagerly accept an opportunity or offer. It is often used to describe a situation where someone is excited about the chance to do something or to receive something.

Example: You should jump at the opportunity to work for that company.

Jump Down

Jump Down

  • Meaning: To jump from a higher place to a lower place
  • Example: The cat jumped down from the tree branch to the ground.

Jump Down

  • Meaning: To criticize or reprimand someone:
  • Example: The teacher jumped down the student’s throat for not doing their homework.

Jump Down

  • Meaning: To suddenly change one’s opinion or position:
  • Example: The politician jumped down from their previous stance on the issue.

Jump In

Jump in

  • Meaning: Jump in means to enter a conversation or activity without being invited or waiting for an invitation.
  • Example: She jumped in with her opinion before I finished speaking.

Jump in

  • Meaning: To start to do something quickly without spending a long time thinking first. 
  • Example: If you want to learn how to swim, you just need to jump in the water and start practicing.

Jump Off

  • Meaning: To move from an elevated place by one jump. It is often used to describe someone jumping from a high place, such as a diving board or a cliff. 
  • Example: She always jumps off the swing at the highest point.

Jump On

Jump On

  • Meaning: To criticize or blame someone harshly and angrily. It is often used in informal situations and can be used to express strong disapproval or anger towards someone.
  • Example: You shouldn’t jump on your colleague for making a mistake. Everyone makes mistakes sometimes.

Jump On

  • Meaning: To board or get on a vehicle or mode of transportation
  • Example: I need to jump on the bus to get to work.

Jump Out

Jump Out

  • Meaning: To suddenly move away from something or someone or to become noticeable.
  • Example: The clown jumped out of the box and scared the children.

Jump Out

  • Meaning: To be very noticeable or obvious to someone, often in a surprising or unexpected way.
  • Example: The red car jumped out at me from among the other cars in the parking lot.

Jump Up

Jump Up

  • Meaning: To quickly stand up from a seated or lying position. It is often used to express excitement, enthusiasm, or surprise.
  • Example: As soon as the rollercoaster started, I jumped up with excitement.

Interactive Exercise

Instructions: Choose the correct phrasal verb to complete each sentence.

1. I always __________ of bed as soon as my alarm goes off in the morning.

  • a) jump at
  • b) jump down
  • c) jump in
  • d) jump off
  • e) jump on
  • f) jump out
  • g) jump up

2. The kids were having so much fun playing that I decided to __________ and join them.

  • a) jump at
  • b) jump down
  • c) jump in
  • d) jump off
  • e) jump on
  • f) jump out
  • g) jump up

3. The athlete had to __________ the competition due to an injury.

  • a) jump at
  • b) jump down
  • c) jump in
  • d) jump off
  • e) jump on
  • f) jump out
  • g) jump up

4. The cat always __________ the counter to reach for food.

  • a) jump at
  • b) jump down
  • c) jump in
  • d) jump off
  • e) jump on
  • f) jump out
  • g) jump up

5. I decided to __________ the opportunity to travel abroad and study a new language.

  • a) jump at
  • b) jump down
  • c) jump in
  • d) jump off
  • e) jump on
  • f) jump out
  • g) jump up

6. The firefighter had to __________ the burning building to save the people trapped inside.

  • a) jump at
  • b) jump down
  • c) jump in
  • d) jump off
  • e) jump on
  • f) jump out
  • g) jump up

7. The audience couldn’t help but __________ and dance along to the catchy tune.

  • a) jump at
  • b) jump down
  • c) jump in
  • d) jump off
  • e) jump on
  • f) jump out
  • g) jump up

Answers

  1. d) jump off
  2. c) jump in
  3. d) jump off
  4. e) jump on
  5. a) jump at
  6. f) jump out
  7. g) jump up

Related Phrasal Verbs Links: 

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3 thoughts on “7 Phrasal Verbs with Jump in English”

    • I can tell you that “jump down” and “jump off” are indeed quite similar in meaning. However, there are some subtle differences between the two phrases.

      “Jump down” usually means to jump from a higher level to a lower level. For example, you might jump down from a tree or a ledge.

      “Jump off” can also mean to jump from a higher level to a lower level, but it can also mean to jump from a stationary position, such as jumping off a diving board or jumping off a platform.

      So, the main difference between the two phrases is that “jump down” implies a change in elevation, while “jump off” does not necessarily imply a change in elevation.

      Reply

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