6 Phrasal Verbs with Kick in English

If you’re learning English, understanding phrasal verbs is essential. These are phrases where a verb is combined with one or more particles like prepositions or adverbs, creating a new meaning.

One of the most commonly used is phrasal verbs with the verb “kick”. You will learn some phrasal verbs such as “kick off,” “kick out,” “kick up,” “kick around,” “kick down,” and “kick in.” Explore their meanings and use them in your conversations confidently.

Phrasal Verbs with KICK

6 Phrasal Verbs with Kick in English
Popular Phrasal Verbs with Kick – Created by 7ESL

Kick Off

The phrasal verb “kick off” has several meanings, depending on the context in which it is used. Some of the most common meanings of “kick off” are:

  • To start or begin something, such as a game, a meeting, or an event.

Example: “Let’s kick off the party with a game of charades.”

  • To dismiss or remove someone from a position or group.

 Example: “The coach decided to kick off the player from the team after he missed several practices.”

  • To die or quit permanently.

Example: “The old man finally kicked off after a long illness.”

Kick Out

The phrasal verb “kick out” means to force someone to leave a place or situation. It is often used informally and can be used in a variety of contexts. Here are some of the available meanings of “kick out”:

  • To expel someone from a school or organization

Example: The school kicked out the student for cheating on the exam.

  • To remove someone from a job or position

Example: The company kicked out the CEO for embezzlement.

  • To evict someone from a property

Example: The landlord kicked out the tenants for not paying rent.

  • To reject someone from a group or gathering

Example: The bouncer kicked out the rowdy patrons from the club.

Kick Up

“Kick up” is a phrasal verb that means to make something, especially dust or dirt, rise from the ground. It can also mean to cause trouble or a fuss.

Example

  • The car sped off, kicking up a cloud of dust.
  • The wind kicked up and blew away all the leaves.
  • The construction work next door is kicking up a lot of dust.
  • The new policy has kicked up a lot of controversy.
  • The boss kicked up a fuss when he found out about the mistake.

Kick Around

The phrasal verb “kick around” can have multiple meanings depending on the context. It can mean to move from one place to another informally, to discuss an idea or plan informally, or to treat someone unkindly and unfairly.

For example: 

  • We decided to kick around Italy and explore different cities and towns.
  • Let’s kick around some ideas for the new project and see what we come up with.
  • He can’t kick me around anymore. I stood up for myself and he knows I won’t take it anymore.

Kick Down

When you kick down something, it means you break it with your feet. This phrasal verb is often used informally to describe someone using their feet to break something that is in their way or is causing them frustration.

For example:

  • You can’t just kick down the door, you need to find the key first.
  • He was so angry that he kicked down the chair in front of him.

Kick In

The phrasal verb “kick in” has several meanings, depending on the context in which it is used. Some of the most common meanings of “kick in” are:

  • Contribute money

Example: Everyone agreed to kick in $10 for the pizza party.

  • Start to work or take effect

Example: The pain medication will kick in after about 30 minutes.

  • Begin to operate or function

Example: The car engine finally kicked in after several tries.

  • Break something with your feet

Example: The burglar kicked in the window to get inside the house.

Phrasal Verbs with Kick with Meaning and Examples
Common Phrasal Verbs with Kick – Created by 7ESL

Interactive Exercise

Multiple Choice

Choose the best answer from the three choices given.

  1. What does “kick off” mean? a) To start or begin something b) To stop something from happening c) To kick a ball out of bounds
  2. What does “kick out” mean? a) To kick a ball towards a goal b) To start a fight c) To force someone to leave a place
  3. What does “kick in” mean? a) To start working or become effective b) To stop working or become ineffective c) To kick a ball high into the air
  4. What does “kick down” mean? a) To kick a ball with a lot of force b) To break down a door by kicking it c) To kick someone out of a group or organization
  5. What does “kick around” mean? a) To discuss informally or casually b) To kick a ball around for fun c) To kick someone repeatedly as a form of bullying

Answers:

  1. a) To start or begin something
  2. c) To force someone to leave a place
  3. a) To start working or become effective
  4. b) To break down a door by kicking it
  5. a) To discuss informally or casually