Pronunciation of ED: Past Tense Pronunciation for Regular Verbs

ED Pronunciation! Learn useful rules for Pronunciation of ED ending (Past Tense Pronunciation for Regular Verbs) in English with list of common regular verbs, video and ESL printable worksheets.

Regular Verbs

The regular verb is one which conforms to the normal grammar rules surrounding the use of verbs. In English, there are a huge amount of regular verbs, and its important to know what these are and the rules that they follow. This will help you to ensure that your sentences are grammatically correct and easy to understand.

In the English language, most regular verbs are turned into the past tense by adding ‘-ed’ to the end of a base form of the verb.

Regular verbs examples:

  • Wait → Waited
  • Want → Wanted
  • Ask → Asked
  • Wash → Washed
  • Cook → Cooked
  • Walk → Walked
  • Hunt → Hunted
  • Adopt → Adopted

Learn more about Irregular verbs that do not follow the above rules.

For past tense pronunciation for regular verbs, the final -ed ending has three different pronunciations: /t/, /d/, and /id/.

Pronunciation of ED | The /t/ Sound

Past Tense Pronunciation Rules:

  • Final -ed is pronounced /t/ after all voiceless sounds.
  • Voiceless sounds are made by pushing air through your mouth; no sound comes from your throat.
  • Voiceless consonant soundsp, f, k, s, sh, ch, th

Past Tense Pronunciation Examples with regular verbs list.

In this section, we are going to be presenting you with a comprehensive list of the regular verbs which can be found within the English language.

  • Announce → Announced
  • Cook → Cooked
  • Walk → Walked
  • Talk → Talked
  • Finish → Finished
  • Type → Typed
  • Dance → Danced
  • Watch → Watched
  • Look → Looked
  • Miss → Missed
  • Rush → Rushed
  • Hope → Hoped
  • Wish → Wished
  • Dress → Dressed
  • Practice → Practiced
  • Cough → Coughed
  • Help → Helped
  • Develop → Developed
  • Knock → Knocked
  • Snatch → Snatched
  • Step → Stepped
  • Punish → Punished
  • Hush (up) → Hushed (up)
  • Mix (up) → Mixed (up)
  • Wrap → Wrapped
  • Stalk → Stalked
  • Fish → Fished
  • Slap → Slapped
  • Force → Forced
  • Discuss → Discussed
  • Hitchhike → Hitchhiked
  • Laugh → Laughed
  • Brush → Brushed
  • Crash → Crashed
  • Work → Worked
  • Like → Liked
  • Attack → Attacked
  • Lock → Locked
  • Stop → Stopped
  • Ask → Asked
  • Wash → Washed
  • Brake → Braked
  • Escape → Escaped
  • Kiss → Kissed
  • Trip → Tripped
  • Jump → Jumped
  • Promise → Promised
  • Slip → Slipped
  • Touch → Touched
  • Fix → Fixed
  • Piss (off) → Pissed (off)
  • Pip → Ripped
  • Check → Checked
  • Pluck → Plucked
  • Coax → Coaxed
  • Rehearse → Rehearsed
  • Curse → Cursed
  • Jinx → Jinxed
  • Banish → Banished
  • Dunk → Dunked
  • Push → Pushed
  • Fake → Faked
  • Flush → Flushed
  • Back (up) → Backed (up)
  • Place → Placed
  • Reduce → Reduced

ED Pronunciation | The /d/ Sound

Pronunciation of ED Rules:

  • Final -ed is pronounced /d/ after voiced sounds.
  • The /d/ is blended together with the previous consonant and not pronounced as an extra syllable.
  • Voiced sounds come from your throat. Touch your neck when you make a voiced sound, you can feel your voice box vibrate.
  • Voiced consonant sounds: b, v, g, z, j, th, l, m, n, r
  • All vowel sounds are voiced.

ED Pronunciation Examples with regular verbs list.

  • Live → Lived
  • Climb → Climbed
  • Phone → Phoned
  • Wave → Waved
  • Arrive → Arrived
  • Clear → Cleared
  • Study → Studied
  • Open → Opened
  • Enjoy → Enjoyed
  • Copy → Copied
  • Mail → Mailed
  • Call → Called
  • Borrow → Borrowed
  • Hurry → Hurried
  • Sign → Signed
  • Play → Played
  • Carry → Carried
  • Move → Moved
  • Pull → Pulled
  • Wonder → Wondered
  • Kill → Killed
  • Marry → Married
  • Believe → Believed
  • Beg → Begged
  • Prefer → Preferred
  • Tease → Teased
  • Close → Closed
  • Accuse → Accused
  • Stroll → Strolled
  • Shrug → Shrugged
  • Praise → Praised
  • Follow → Followed
  • Bog down → Bogged down
  • Encourage → Encouraged
  • Listen → Listened
  • Tour → Toured
  • Consider → Considered
  • Travel → Traveled
  • Stay → Stayed
  • Rescue → Rescued
  • Happen → Happened
  • Destroy → Destroyed
  • Refuse → Refused
  • Die → Died
  • Belittle → Belittled
  • Question → Questioned
  • Discover → Discovered
  • Argue → Argued
  • Try → Tried
  • Cry → Cried
  • Lie → Lied
  • Use → Used
  • Clean → Cleaned
  • Love → Loved
  • Design → Designed
  • Change → Changed
  • Join → Joined
  • Grab → Grabbed
  • Seem → Seemed
  • Explain → Explained
  • Rob → Robbed
  • Continue → Continued
  • Hire → Hired
  • Store → Stored
  • Heal → Healed
  • Foster → Fostered
  • Learn → Learned
  • Sue → Sued
  • Harm → Harmed

Past Tense Pronunciation for Regular Verbs | The /id/ Sound

Final -ed is pronounced /id/ after “T”, and “D” sounds. The sound /id/ adds a whole syllable to a word.

Pronunciation of ED Examples with regular verbs list.

  • Suggest → Suggested
  • Vote → Voted
  • Wait → Waited
  • Want → Wanted
  • Shout → Shouted
  • Hunt → Hunted
  • Adopt → Adopted
  • Emigrate → Emigrated
  • Start → Started
  • Visit → Visited
  • Investigate → Investigated
  • Attend → Attended
  • Affect → Affected
  • Chat → Chatted
  • Heat → Heated
  • Sort → Sorted
  • Regret → Regretted
  • Wast → Wasted
  • Interrupt → Interrupted
  • Mind → Minded
  • Sound → Sounded
  • Count → Counted
  • Demand → Demanded
  • Hesitate → Hesitated
  • Proceed → Proceeded
  • Succeed → Succeeded
  • Accept → Accepted
  • Paint → Painted
  • Contact → Contacted
  • Hate → Hated
  • Include → Included
  • Land → Landed
  • Need → Needed
  • Recommend → Recommended
  • End → Ended
  • Grade → Graded
  • Rate → Rated
  • Hesitate → Hesitated
  • Decide → Decided
  • Interest → Interested
  • Trade → Traded
  • Last → Lasted
  • Insist → Insisted
  • Avoid → Avoided
  • State → Stated
  • Taste → Tasted
  • Admit → Admitted
  • Invent → Invented
  • Create → Created
  • Compete → Competed
  • Intend → Intended
  • Concoct → Concocted
  • Request → Requested
  • Disregard → Disregarded
  • Assist → Assisted
  • Ground → Grounded
  • Lift → Lifted
  • Overreact → Overreacted
  • Bound → Bounded
  • Pretend → Pretended
  • Twist → Twisted
  • Cheat → Cheated
  • Outsmart → Outsmarted
  • Disappoint → Disappointed
  • Scold → Scolded
  • Mistreat → Mistreated
  • Attempt → Attempted
  • Coexist → Coexisted

Pronunciation of ED | Picture

Pronunciation of ED Table: the /t/, /d/ and /id/ sound with regular verbs examples.

Pronunciation of ED

ED Pronunciation Video

Pronunciation of ED: Past Tense Pronunciation for Regular Verbs

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Hoang
Hoang
1 year ago

Hi,
I have a question, the word “climb”, it is a silent “b”, how come it has the ending sound /b/ to sound /d/ when adding “ed”? Is it a mistake in your infographic? Can you explain to me? And if it is, I would love to have it fixed because I love your infographic.
Thank you.

S. Cal
S. Cal
9 months ago
Reply to  Hoang

The “b” remains silent. the /d/ sound is because of the “m”

Javier LO
Javier LO
8 months ago
Reply to  Hoang

Hello Hoang, yeah, “b” in “climb” is silent
then you have “m” as the final sound in “climb” /klaim/
As “m” is voiced, it produces vibration in your vocal cords, that’s why -ed in “climbed” has an ending sound “d” –> /klaimd/
Javier.

William
William
7 months ago
Reply to  Hoang

Still wrong to put it in the /b/ line though

Elizabeth
Elizabeth
1 year ago

Hoang, I believe it happens because, even with the final B in CLIMB and BOMB being mute, as the final sound becomes M, it still fits the rule – they’d be pronounced CLIM’D and BOM’D, because final M also has a D sound when added ED.
Hope it helps.

Anonymous
Anonymous
1 year ago

What about studied

S. Cal
S. Cal
9 months ago
Reply to  Anonymous

The “y” of study is a voiced sound, therefore you would use the /d/

jani
jani
8 months ago

You have Teethed showing up both on voiceless and voiced sounds, which one is correct?

Jen in NYC
Jen in NYC
8 months ago
Reply to  jani

Hi, Jani. “To teethe” means to grow teeth or to cut one’s teeth. The final “th” is voiced, like in “this” or “them,” therefore you would use the /d/ sound. Having said all that, you rarely would use this verb in the simple past; instead, it’s almost always used as a present participle, “The baby is teething” or as a gerund: “Teething is painful.”.

Jolanta
Jolanta
2 months ago

Please, correct Wast to Waste.

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