10 Summer Idioms in English With Meanings

Summer is a season that brings a lot of joy and excitement. It’s a time when people can enjoy the warm weather, spend time outdoors, and take part in various activities. It’s also a season when people use many idioms in their conversations. These idioms are a fun and creative way to express oneself and communicate with others. In this article, we’ll explore some of the most common summer idioms in English and their meanings.

What Are Summer Idioms?

As the temperature rises and the sun shines bright, summer brings with it a plethora of idioms that are commonly used in English. Summer idioms are expressions that incorporate elements of the summer season to convey particular meanings, often unrelated to the literal terms used. These idioms can refer to the weather, activities associated with summer, or feelings that the season evokes.

10 Summer Idioms in English With Meanings Pin

Here are some common summer idioms and their meanings:

  • Dog days of summer – The hottest, most uncomfortable part of summer, typically in July and August.
  • Make hay while the sun shines – Take advantage of favorable conditions; don’t waste a good opportunity.
  • Cool as a cucumber – This idiom is used to describe someone who is calm and composed, even in hot and stressful situations. 

List of Summer Idioms

  • Dog Days of Summer
  • Beat The Heat
  • Make Hay While The Sun Shines
  • Chasing The Sun
  • To Come Out in The Wash
  • Like a Fish Out of Water
  • All Things Under The Sun
  • Sunshine and Roses
  • Full of Hot Air
  • Cool as a cucumber

Summer Idioms with Meanings and Examples

Dog Days of Summer

Meaning

The term “Dog Days” comes from the ancient Greeks and Romans, who believed that the hot summer weather was caused by the star Sirius, also known as the “Dog Star.” The Dog Days were thought to be a time of bad luck, drought, and unrest.

Usage

Today, the phrase “Dog Days of Summer” is used to describe a period of time when the weather is extremely hot and uncomfortable. It can also be used to describe a period of inactivity or laziness, as the heat can make it difficult to be productive.

Examples

  • “I don’t feel like doing anything today, it’s just too hot. It’s the Dog Days of Summer, after all.”
  • “I can’t wait for fall to arrive. These Dog Days of Summer are killing me.”
  • “We’ll have to wait until the Dog Days of Summer are over before we can start any outdoor projects.”

Beat The Heat

Meaning

“Beat the heat” means to find ways to cope with hot weather and stay comfortable.

Usage

This idiom is often used in conversations about summer weather. It can be used to suggest ways to stay cool or to describe how someone is coping with the heat.

Examples

  • “Let’s go to the beach to beat the heat.”
  • “We’re going to the pool to beat the heat.”
  • “I’m drinking lots of water to beat the heat.”

Some other ways to “beat the heat” include:

  • Staying indoors in air conditioning
  • Wearing loose, light-colored clothing
  • Eating cold foods like ice cream or salads
  • Taking a cool shower or bath

Make Hay While The Sun Shines

Meaning

The idiom “Make Hay While The Sun Shines” means that we should take advantage of the favorable conditions to do something that needs to be done. It implies that we should not waste time and should seize the opportunity while it lasts.

Usage

This idiom is often used to encourage people to take action and not procrastinate. It can be used in various contexts, such as work, school, or personal life. For example, if you have a project that needs to be completed, you can use this idiom to encourage yourself or others to work on it while the conditions are favorable.

Examples

  • “We should make hay while the sun shines and finish this project before the deadline.”
  • “The weather is perfect for a picnic. Let’s make hay while the sun shines and have some fun.”
  • “The stock market is doing well. We should make hay while the sun shines and invest some money.”

Chasing The Sun

Meaning

The phrase “Chasing The Sun” means to make the most of the daylight hours and enjoy the summer season to the fullest.

Usage

This idiom is commonly used to describe the desire to spend as much time outside as possible during the summer months.

Examples

  • “We’re planning a road trip across the country, chasing the sun and exploring new places.”
  • “Let’s head to the beach early tomorrow and spend the whole day chasing the sun.”
  • “I love chasing the sun during the summer, whether it’s hiking in the mountains or lounging by the pool.”

To Come Out in The Wash

Meaning

The phrase “to come out in the wash” is often used to reassure someone that a situation will work itself out. It suggests that any problems or issues will be resolved over time, just as dirty clothes become clean after they are washed.

Usage

This idiom is often used in informal conversations, especially when someone is worried or stressed about a situation. It can be used to express optimism and hope that everything will turn out fine in the end.

Examples in Conversation

Example 1:

  • “I’m really worried about this project. I don’t think we have enough time to finish it.”
  • “Don’t worry, it will all come out in the wash. We’ve been in tight spots before and we always manage to pull through.”

Example 2:

  • “I’m not sure if I’m going to get the job. There were so many other qualified candidates.”
  • “Just remember, it will all come out in the wash. If it’s meant to be, you’ll get the job.”

Example 3:

  • “I can’t believe I lost my phone. What am I going to do?”
  • “Relax, it will all come out in the wash. You’ll find it eventually or get a new one. It’s not the end of the world.”

Like a Fish Out of Water

Meaning

The phrase “like a fish out of water” means to feel awkward or uncomfortable in an unfamiliar environment or situation.

Usage

This idiom can be used in both formal and informal settings to describe a person who is struggling to adapt to a new situation. It can also be used to describe a person who is not suited for a particular task or job.

Examples

  • “I felt like a fish out of water at the fancy dinner party.”
  • “He looked like a fish out of water when he tried to fix the car engine.”
  • “She was like a fish out of water when she moved to the big city.”

All Things Under The Sun

Meaning

The idiom “all things under the sun” refers to everything possible or imaginable in the world. It is often used to emphasize the vast range of subjects, options, or items that could be considered in a particular context.

Usage

This phrase can be used in a variety of contexts to imply an extensive, almost limitless variety of things. It can be used to talk about a wide range of topics, choices, or possibilities that are available or that one encounters.

Examples

  • “The library had books on all things under the sun, from quantum physics to medieval poetry.”
  • “When it comes to choosing a career path, young people today have all things under the sun to consider.”
  • “The festival celebrated all things under the sun, featuring music, art, and food from cultures around the world.”

Sunshine and Roses

Meaning

The phrase “sunshine and roses” is used to describe a situation that is happy, carefree, and enjoyable. It can also refer to a situation that is easy and without any problems.

Usage

We often use the phrase “sunshine and roses” to describe a variety of situations, including a vacation, a day spent at the beach, or a relaxing afternoon in the park. It can also be used to describe a relationship that is going well or a project that is progressing smoothly.

Examples

  • “We spent the day at the beach and it was all sunshine and roses.”
  • “Our relationship has been all sunshine and roses lately.”
  • “The project is going well and it’s been all sunshine and roses so far.”

Full of Hot Air

Meaning

When we say someone is “full of hot air,” we mean that they are speaking in a way that is exaggerated or insincere. They may be making promises they can’t keep, or they may be talking about things they don’t really understand.

Usage

This idiom can be used to describe people in a variety of contexts, from politicians to salespeople to friends who like to brag. It’s often used in a negative way, to suggest that the person being described is not trustworthy or reliable.

Examples

  • “I wouldn’t trust that guy if I were you. He’s always talking a big game, but he’s really just full of hot air.”
  • “Don’t listen to her. She’s just full of hot air. She doesn’t know what she’s talking about.”
  • “I was excited about that job offer at first, but after talking to the boss, I realized he was just full of hot air. There’s no way he can deliver on his promises.”

Cool as a cucumber

Meaning

The phrase “cool as a cucumber” means to be calm and composed, especially in difficult or stressful situations.

Usage

This idiom can be used in a variety of situations, from sports to business to everyday life. It is often used to describe someone who is able to remain calm and focused, even in high-pressure situations.

Examples

  • “Even though the deadline was approaching, she remained cool as a cucumber and finished the project on time.”
  • “Despite the intense heat, he remained cool as a cucumber on the tennis court and won the match.”
  • “When the power went out, she remained cool as a cucumber and calmly found the flashlight.”

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