Wolf in Sheep's Clothing

Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing: What Does this Interesting Idiom Mean?

Wolf in sheep’s clothing is a great idiom which is said regularly in a lot of English conversations. But what is the meaning of this term? In this article, we are going to take a look at not only the meaning of this but also where it came from. We are also going to study some examples of the term being used in order to further understand it.

Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing

Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing Meaning

The term wolf in sheep’s clothing refers to a person who comes across as nice but underneath has a hidden agenda which is not very nice.

Origin of this saying

The origin of the term wolf in sheep’s clothing can be found in the book of Matthew from the Holy Bible in which Jesus gave a speech in which he coined this term.

“Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing” Examples

Examples in Sentences

Let’s now take a look at some examples of sentences in which the term wolf in sheep’s clothing might appear, bu doing this we will be able to further understand how it works.

The first sentence is one being said by a mother to her son.

  • That new girlfriend of yours seems nice but I think she is only with you for your money, she is surely a wolf in sheep’s clothing.

The second example sentence is being stated by a politician about his rival.

  • He is doing things to have you trust him but his agenda is not what it seems, do not fall into the trap of this wolf in sheep’s clothing.

Conversation Examples

There are multiple conversations in which you might hear the term wolf in sheep’s clothing, we shall now have a look at some of these conversations.

The first conversation is taking place between two people in the workplace.

  • Person 1: “There is a new manager, have you met him?”
  • Person 2: “Yes, he seems very nice.”
  • Person 1: “No, he might seem nice but he is planning on firing a lot of us, he’s a real wolf in sheep’s clothing.”

Conversation two is taking place between two friends.

  • Person 1: “I am not going to be seeing Anna anymore.”
  • Person 2: “Whyever not?”
  • Person 1: “She has been trying to be really nice to me but then I found out that she had been having an affair with my husband.”
  • Person 2: “Wow, she’s a proper wolf in sheep’s clothing isn’t she.”

More interesting examples:

  • My friends sometimes call me a wolf in sheep’s clothing.
  • Beware of him. He is a wolf in sheep’s clothing.
  • He is not to be trusted. He is a wolf in sheep’s clothing.
  • I’m shocked by what you are telling me that Ken is a wolf in sheep’s clothing.
  • Mrs. Smith trusted the lawyer until she realized that he was a wolf in sheep’s clothing.
  • Beware of the chief of police. He seems polite, but he’s a wolf in sheep’s clothing.

Other Ways to Say the Idiom

There are other ways in which you might say the term wolf in sheep’s clothing.

Let’s take a look at some examples of things you might say.

  • A sly person
  • Cunning
  • Hypocrite

Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing | Image

Wolf in Sheep's Clothing

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